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Posts Tagged ‘pattern’

Let me introduce my new addiction to you.

It’s crocheted granny squares, everybody.

 
 

This is what I am talking about.

If you come somewhere these days and find about 20 squares like these lying around you will know I must have been there.

 
 

What I like about them?

They are colorful.

They are cheerful.

And they can be easily transformed into awesome things like coasters, rugs, or purses.

And in my world those things rule.

 

So far I’ve made a few coasters and plan to make a purse.

Actually, the purse is half-finished and I can’t wait to show it to you.

 

But until then, here’s a little picture tutorial showing how to make a very simple granny square.

You’ll need 4 different colors of yarn and a hook.

 
 

1. With first color, CH 4 and join to first ch with a SL ST to form a ring.

 
 

2. CH 3 (counts as first double crochet now and throughout), 2 DC in ring, CH 1,*3 DC, CH 1 in ring three times. Join with a SL ST to the top of the first ch 3.

Finish off.

 

3. With a second color (I am using blue here) join yarn with a SL ST (or any way you prefer) to any ch 1 space.

 
 

4. CH 3, 2 DC in ring below, 1 TC, 3 DC, CH 1 in same space. *3 DC, 1 TC in ring below, 3 DC, CH 1* in each chain 1 space around. Join with a SL ST to top of first ch 3.

Finish off.

 
 

5. With third color (I am using red here) join yarn with a SL ST to any tc stitch. CH 3, 2 DC, CH 1, 3 DC, CH 1) in same stitch [this is starting the corner of your square]. *Skip next 3 dc, in ch 1 space 3 DC, CH 1. 3 DC, CH1, 3 DC in next tc. CH 1.*

Repeat  *…* two more times.

Skip next 3 dc, in ch 1 space 3 DC, CH 1. Join with a SL ST to top of first ch 3.

Finish off.

 
 

6. With the first color join with a SL ST to any corner ch 1 space. In same space CH 3, 2 DC, 1 TC, 3 DC, CH 1.

 
 

*Skip next 3 dc, in ch 1 space 3 DC, CH 1 two times. In corner ch 1 space 3 DC, 1 TC, 3 DC, CH 1. Repeat from * two more times. Skip next 3 dc and crochet 3 DC, CH 1 in two next chain 1 spaces. Join with a SL ST to the top of first ch 3.

Finish off.

 
 

7. With fourth yarn (I am using black here) join with a SL ST to corner tc stitch. In same stitch CH 3, 2 DC, CH 1, 3 DC, CH 1.

 
 

*Skip next 3 dc set, 3 DC, CH 1 in ch 1 space; repeat two more times. 3 DC, CH 1, 3 DC, CH 1 in corner tc stitch. Repeat from * two more times.

Skip next 3 dc set, 3 DC, CH 1 in ch 1 space; repeat two more times. Join with a SL ST to the top of first ch 3.

Finish off.

 

And that’s it.

 
 

Here I’ve made a square using a slightly different color scheme.

Though I haven’t strayed too far from the previous one.

 
 

I am sure that once you create your first granny square you won’t be able to stop. Just like me.

It is such a relaxing and satisfying activity.

 

Bye for now, dear friends.

Next up – Granny Square Purse.

 

Love,

Petra
 

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I am an addict.

An addict for crochet slippers.

 

It all began when I saw slippers similar to these on craftgawker.

I loved them so much I couldn’t get their tempting image out of my head.

All I needed was a pattern.

But because I am terribly, terribly impatient, I found creating my own pattern quicker than looking for an official one on the web.

And since I’m no crochet guru, the pattern turned out to be really simple.

Actually, these slippers might be the simplest slippers in the universe.

Or not.

But they might.

 

This is what I did…

 
 

Round 1: 5 ch (chain stitch);  join into ring with sl st (slip stitch)

 

Round 2: 3 ch;  7 dc (double crochet stitch) into the center of the ring;  join with sl st

 
 

Round 3: 3 ch;  1 dc into first stitch;  2 dc into each next stitch; join with sl st

 
 

Round 4: 3 ch;  1 dc into first stitch;  2 dc into each next stitch

 
 

Round 5 – 13: (continue crocheting in spiral);  1 dc into each dc

 
 

Row 14: turn (!);  3 ch;  1 dc into second stitch from hook;  make 20 dc (1 dc into each next dc)

 
 

Row 15 – 21: turn;  3 ch;  1 dc into second stitch from hook;  continue 20 dc (1 dc into each next dc)

 
 

Row 22: turn;  3 ch;  1 dc into first stitch from hook;  continue 21 dc (1 dc into each next dc);  another 1 dc into last stitch

 
 

Row 23 – 25: turn;  3 ch;  1 dc into second stitch from hook;  continue 22 dc (1 dc into each next dc)

 

Row 26: turn;  3 ch;  1 dc into first stitch from hook;  continue 23 dc (1 dc into each next dc); another 1 dc into last stitch

 

Row 27 – 28: turn;  3 ch;  1 dc into second stitch from hook;  continue 24 dc (1 dc into each next dc)

 
 

Finish off.

 
 

Fold the end in half and sew it together.

Make sure it’s turned like shown in the picture  – with the seam finally facing inward.

 
 

Done.

 

Now for the edging:

Tie a yarn of the same or different color to the edge of the slipper.

 
 

That will make our first ‘stitch’.

 
 

Make 2 chain stitches.

Then make 1 single crochet into the next bigger (as I call it) ‘hole’. (Sorry. I’ve warned you that I’m no guru of crochet.)

Then make 1 chain stitch.

 
 

Continue this pattern (1 single crochet stitch; 1 chain stitch) along the edge of your slipper.

Finally, make 1 slip stitch to join with the first stitch.

Finish off.

 
 

And this is it.

 

You can adorn these slippers with colorful buttons, flowers or even crochet swirls.

I really hope you’ll find as much passion in making them as I have.

(Psst…I am already making cute pink ones. Of course, I’ll show them to you as soon as they are finished.)

 

Enjoy, dear friends.

See you soon.

 

Love,

Petra

 

(Oh, one important thing! These slippers were made to fit my feet, which are size 40 – Europe / 6.5 – UK / 9 – US. To adjust the size of these slippers to your feet you may need to change the number of rounds between the round 5 and 13 and the number or rows between the row 15 – 21 of this post. AND… I always use bulky yarn to make my slippers.)

 

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This blogging thing might be the best thing ever invented.

Really.

Maybe right after sweets.

OK… sweets and comedies.

OK… sweets, comedies and … let me stop myself right here and leave…

NOT (you’re gonna have to remove me ’cause I ain’t going nowhere).

Anyways, it’s gorgeous because blogging keeps me thinking about new projects and makes me go on.

I just LOVE IT…

With Easter being just around the corner, I think it is a very good idea to get ready and stuff your home with as many Easter eggs as possible.

And why not have some of them crocheted?

This is my way of creating them.

You can find a pattern below… until then, enjoy the step-by-step pictures.

This is an almost finished egg waiting to be stuffed.

You can stuff your crocheted egg with scrape yarn, cotton stuffing, fiberfill or polyfill.

These can be found in your supermarket or in a craft store.

I marked the ends of the rounds with this pin to know where they started and where they finished.

I really like the shape of this egg (and really don’t like the dryness of my hands).

It’s so cute.

With every new little spring decoration I manage to get, I become more and more relieved.

Because I like to welcome this greatest season of all in a really big style.


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I love working with yarn.

I love knitting, I love crocheting… I just love everything that has something to do with yarn.

It seems to have some magic power over me.

The colors, the needles, the stitches – they transport me into a quiet, peaceful and happy universe.

And I am really lucky to be surrounded by people who like to use the things I make for them (except for my boyfriend – I just can’t make him like and wear slippers like these … and I can’t figure out why).

I made these for my Mom…

Flowers – they make me so happy.

I love to be surrounded by flowers – real or made of yarn – any kind of a flower makes my heart sing.

If you speak the crochet language and would like to create a flower like this, then I have a little surprise for you.

THE FLOWER PATTERN everybody!

And it’s really easy.

As you can see the flower consists of two layers.

They are both made separately – first, the top flower with the yellow center and red edges and then the bottom red flower.

These two flowers are simply sewn together afterward.

Abbreviations:  Ch – chain, Sl st – slip stitch, Sc – single crochet, Hdc – half-double crochet, Dc – double crochet

The crochet language – so impressive!

Enjoy dear friends…


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Fingerless Mittens

This is a story of a girl who was trying to knit with four double-pointed needles for the first time in her whole life.

The story is going to be exciting yet scary.

She struggled…

She felt sad and lonely…

The needles kept attacking her repeatedly …

She even considered wearing protective glasses to save her from having her eyes poked out.

But ultimately she succeeded!

Because she NEVER gives up.

She’s no member of  “The Quitters Club” and she’s never going to be!

For those of you who want to see how it felt to be her the story is as follows:

1. With double-pointed needles, cast on 39 stitches. (Cast your stitches onto 1 needle only. Divide the stitches evenly among 3 needles by slipping them onto 2 more needles.)

2. Once all 3 needles have the same number of stitches, lay the needles flat on a table (or a sofa if you are really have to), loosely lined up end to end. (Your right-most needle should have the working yarn.)

3. Take the left needle in your left hand and the right needle in your right hand. Bring the needles together to form a triangle with the middle needle. Pick up your fourth needle. With the triangle still in place (and the working yarn on the right needle), knit the stitches onto the left needle, pulling working yarn tightly to join.

Are you wondering what you are doing right now?

Well, I will tell you – you are now KNITTING IN THE ROUND!

Can you believe it?

4. Don’t be afraid and knit 57 rounds.

5. And now the magic is going to happen.

In round 58, using scrap yarn as your working yarn, knit 7 stitches off the beginning of your next needle.

Do you have a clue what that could be good for?

At this point I started to doubt the sanity of the people who’d written the pattern.

But then I saw…!

And was utterly amazed (hint – it’s got something to do with a thumb).

6. Now slip these stitches back onto the needle they came from.

7. With your main yarn, knit across the scrap-yarn stitches as well as the rest of the stitches on that needle.

8. Knit the rounds 59 through 83 with the main yarn.

9. Bind off loosely.

10. And now we are going to make the thumb opening.

Remove the scrap yarn carefully.

11. See? A hole has formed. But don’t be scared! That’s how it’s supposed to be – everything is just aaaaaall right.

There’s a series of loops above and below the hole.

Pass 1 empty double pointed needle through the top 7 loops and another through the bottom 7 loops.

You just have to find seven up and down, there’s no other way!

With a third needle and a new piece of yarn knit the 7 stitches on the bottom row, pick up and knit 2 loops at the end of the thumb opening. Now knit the 7 stitches on the top row, pick up and knit 2 loops at the opposite end of the thumb opening.

12. Divide the 18 stitches among 3 needles and knit 14 rows.

13. Bind off loosely.

And of course don’t you forget to make the second mitten too – that one might come in handy in case you are a proud owner of two hands (that’s not a nice kind of humor; shame on me…).

To see where I’ve found the original pattern you can click this if you dare to lose the contact with my wonderful site for a while .


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